Tonny Hilfigar👶

Discovered something that qualifies to be as nonchalant as a toy truck.

#TonnyHilfigar😹

Of course this is personal collection and very sweet. 

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In praise of her audacious simplicity

I have always admired Nandita Das for her simplicity and beauty,  more than I could ever admire Aishwarya Rai or any other world-celebrated beauty. As a teenager, when I would see Rai’s flawless photographs spanning the newspapers, I would say, wow! My eyeballs would be out and I would stare at her perfection.

Das, on the other hand, made me speechless. And experience the sort that makes you pause and think. Her simplicity is audacious and her beauty,  fierce. She is that defiant woman who just walked past glamour and made heads turn. Remember Cannes? While every actor tries to wear the most glamorous clothes and use the boldest strokes of color to draw attention to the best of her face, she snubbed the popular culture. 

Nandita Das at Cannes

It’s an honest confession that I am awed by her will,  the way she never brought herself to chasing conventional perfection. She has done over thirty films in various languages and if I remember her it is for her labour of love and her natural performance and the shining apathy to towards trying to fit in. 

And while the subject is on, one must not dare to forget Smita Patil who detested wearing makeup at all and appeared on screen with her pimples and scars showing off. If you find someone who’s got the guts to tell it as it is, celebrate them.

Smita Patil

My personal taste is simplicity, perhaps also because my mother lives by it and equates it to sincerity. 

Reading Simone de Beauvoir

I am currently reading The second sex, the book. It’s also known as the feminist’s bible, the encyclopaedia of feminism, the women, their becoming of women. 

Here’s a picture of Simone de Beauvoir with Jean-Paul Sartre.

Sartre once said to Beauvoir that she had the intelligence of a man, which Beauvoir received as a compliment until she realised what it implied.

She says, it implied that the man is a human being and the woman is a female.

In her book, The second sex, she states that one is not born a woman, but one becomes a woman. She accuses the civilization for it. 

I have been trying get hold of her work for a while but too much of good literature (and also  non-literary stuff) gets in my way. As I finally lay my hands on this masterpiece, I promised to share what I feel would not be worth resisting to. 


So what’s my next obsession? Beauvoir’s work.

#SimonedeBeauvoir

#Thesecondsex

We don’t know each other

With those intellect-drenched texts read,  those paintings stared at,  those strokes traced, those art pieces that pass off as vintage and occult and obscure studied with blank, awed eyes, who knows who knows what, really. Who knows, really, how many of us have managed to fool ourselves with the theory that we are trying to learn patience, that we have changed for good, that we did not hurt others, that hurting a certain person was justified because it served a purpose, that hurting can be for a noble cause, bah. Who gives it a moment of honest thought that we have lied to ourselves and chosen not to count. Who is willing to accept that we don’t like question marks and we omit them by choice.  Who has maintained that understanding others even in anger and grief is a choice one can make, even if it hurts to.   Does it ever bother us when we decide not to think because a small pain in our heart causes us to return it in multifold to others…Do we have so many people on earth… so many as to hurt and forget because being hurt is a sacrifice that entitles us to say whatsoever, act howsoever in the name of respect for self. That we read, talk, laugh but when it comes to living, we live to fulfil a great lie. 

P. S. I have omitted question mark  by choice. 

A few good men – movie review

The movie begins with the murder of William Santiago, a marine of United States of America posted at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Two other marines Dawson and Downey are charged with murder, conspiracy of murder and conduct unbecoming USA.
The movie poses a question to the practices in army but that is not why I watched A few good men five times in the past two months. There’s something special in the honesty of the characters of this movie.

An eloquent JoAnne Galloway, Lieutenant Commander and a prolific lawyer, played by Demi Moore, shows keenness towards taking up the case in her belief that there’s more to it than two marines killing another. However, given her skills that threaten to stir up the sacred and clandestine codes of the army, the case is cautiosly handed to Lieutenant Daniel Kaffee, an immature and disinterested lawyer who has a record of out of court settlements. This character that spends more time playing softball than in office is played by Tom Cruise.

As Counsellor Kaffee’s clients, Dawson and Downey do not reveal much. They answer what they have been asked, and say not a word or a gesture more. Dawson is acknowledges that his taciturnity with respect to this case might get him into trouble, but he is headstrong and takes pride in and values code before anything else. He is not afraid of the punishment that awaits him whereas Downey has no say of his own. He follows Dawson. With Dawson’s lip tight, Counsellor Kaffee has nothing but speculations and small clues that come his way during the course of collecting evidences. Galloway, who is Kaffee’s superior, dissuades him from out of court settlement that he looks for and almost forces him go deeper into the case. 

The badass is played spectacularly by Colonel Nathan Jessup who is not only foul mouthed but also a sexist that thinks not once before humiliating whomever fails to understand his altruistic code of conduct.

Kaffee’s most important witness kills himself by firing a pistol into his throat. Despite this, Kaffee outstands himself as a lawyer and the movie gets the better of him. His disclosing of  his courtroom strategies before entering the court for the final time might not please everyone because of the harm it causes to one’s curiosity. As for me, it goes well with my personal taste, as he only tells what he’s going to do and not how. The process in itself is splendid. 

The climax, though predictable, hinges on an irony where one is left to reconsider the limits of code when it comes to moral values. The movie spares no one in that it hits hard in the face with truth and sadness and sends a blow to the concept of a happy or a morose ending. 

All the characters are a treat to the senses. The energy, the vocal capabilities  poise of actors come full fledged and suit the time and place the movie is set in. Extraordinary acting skills and a struggle for justice that runs underneath marches ahead of the simple plot.

This

A strange bird in Walter Sisulu,   South Africa. Strange because I can’t tell which.Apparently, I’m never going to be done with memories. 

Whoosh!

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